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Past to Present - the 70s


Past to Present - the 70s

Artist: Jay Graydon
Label: Sonic Thrust Records
Cat. no: STRCD-008
Release date: February, 2006
UPC A. 634479243837

From the Garden Rake Studios tape vault... super sounds of the 70s... an album as close to AIRPLAY as it will ever get... This 8th album on Jay's own record label Sonic Thrust Records features Jay Graydon on vocals, guitars, bass and some synth stuff; great singers such as Bill Champlin, Marc Jordan, Tata Vega, Lisa DalBello, Ed Whiting and more. On all tracks other musicians include such top names as David Foster, Jeff Porcaro, Mike Baird, David Hungate, Mike Porcaro, Greg Mathieson, to name a few. The album has 20 tracks and this stuff has never been released before. Apart from the main songs, there are a few bonus tracks - fun stuff like TV themes, a jingle, and also 2 instrumental tracks.

I dedicate this album to my mother Grace, who passed on January 13th, 2006. She has always been a great mother and has always supported my musical journey — I love my mom very much!!!!!!!
As I complete these extensive liner notes, I had finished the mastering on December 31, 2005. Finally, all done! Just before I had finished mixing the songs, I had given my mom a CDR that had the mixes to date (most of the mixes). She loved the songs and performances!!!
- Jay

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Here below Jay Graydon's extended liner notes for his album Past to Present - the 70s:

Jay:
Please allow me to start by saying this project has taken many months of major work fixing sonic nightmares as to make presentable. Things will unfold as you read on.

The CD has typical liner notes BUT the recordings need major information as to note important details. Since too many pages to print as to fit in the jewel case, also to eliminate small print, the logical way to note is via the web site. I hope you enjoy the full details!

For those of you familiar with the AIRPLAY album, I humbly state you will like this CD. The odds are good another AIRPLAY album will never be recorded, but the good news is this CD is as close as it gets, as some of the songs were demos for the AIRPLAY album, as well as some other demos we considered recording!

Other than the AIRPLAY demos that were recorded as masters, other artists recorded some of the other songs. Yea, the story will unfold as you read on.

Writing liner notes usually occur after the recordings have been mixed. Not in this case as I am typing details as I work on each song as to not forget discoveries. Yea, not the common way to deal with liner notes but neither is working on songs recorded around 30 years ago. Actually, this stuff is not liner notes as noted but a full story instead.


The Reasons for Releasing the CD

When realizing I needed to transfer old analog and digital tapes to a non-liner digital recording format (as to preserve), after deciding on Pro Tools HD3 as the recorder format, I came up with a plan that is twofold:

Over the years I have been asked to release stuff from the tape vault. It never happened for many reasons until now. As to learn Pro Tools editing techniques, plug-ins, etc., the demos were the perfect source to work with since most recordings need serious sonic help. Keep in mind the recordings were performed quickly since just demos not intended for release.

Since I would spend the time working with Pro Tools on the stuff in educational land, best to dig in big time and make sound as good as possible and then release for those who would care to hear the stuff.

I had not heard these recordings in the neighborhood of thirty years. I am pleased that the performances are very good for demos. Youthful, energetic, good vocal pitch (for quick performances), and the stuff "feels good"! Also, this CD shows the young performances of some of the best musicians and singers of any era.


History

As noted, over the years, many demos were recorded for albums such as AIRPLAY and others along with demos for other projects such as TV show themes, etc.

Since many of the tapes (2, 8, 16, 24, and 48 tracks) were recorded on tape that now has "binder" problems on account of age, when playing such tapes, since the ‘binder’ is very "sticky", the tape will not play properly sticking to the tape machine guides and heads. One method as to get the tapes to play is to bake them in an oven. I had that performed by a lady who used to work for Ampex doing such work. So in late May of 2005, I started transferring the tapes to Pro Tools as to "tweak", remix, and or re-master.

Since young and naďve when recording most of this stuff, I had not yet realized to note dates, musicians, singers, etc. on the ‘track sheet’ thinking I would never forget. Well, I did forget many details so the lesson here is to always document in full — make sure to keep such documentation with the recordings. Yea, easy to do in this era of Pro Tools (and the like) as you can type in the information for each track noting the performers, dates, studio, etc.

As I work on each song, I try to remember such details but in a few cases, not sure of musicians, etc. With songs on multi track tapes (but not two-track demo mixes, which in some cases are the only tapes found), the songs typically have a verbal count-off by the drummer making it fairly easy to recognize the voice. If no verbal count off (demo 2-tracks mixes), the drummers style is usually obvious. Other musicians are obvious like David Foster and Greg Mathieson but there are some tracks in which I am not sure of the personnel. The remedy here is after the CD is released, I am confident information will unfold. Kerstin will note the details on the web site (www.jaygraydon.com).


Preservation of the Original Material

When thinking about the approach to this project, I realized that I must only use original performances. I could have saved months of time by simply overdubbing new performances but that would not be honest to the project.

(The following under this header is a bunch of technical stuff. The information will bore you unless you have recording experience with analog recorders. Skip down to Songs and Full Details if not interested).

I did replace one bass note as to get rid of a huge original recording technical problem. The good news is I used the same bass I had played on the original recording. This story will be explained when reading details for the song, "Throw A Little Bit of Love My Way".

Note that when transferring the tapes from the analog tape machines, in the case of multi track tapes (8, 16 and 24 track tapes), all were played back on a MCI JH 24 (24 track machine) and recorded to Pro Tools HD3.

Note that if a 24-track tape, all was normal in playback/transfer to Pro Tools meaning each track is clearly its own track. For the 16 track tapes, (most of songs), track 1 is track 1, but then a track is skipped — track 2 becomes track 3 and track 3 becomes track 4. A track is skipped and the same math applies.

Such a method of playback is typical “in a pinch” meaning not the best way to transfer sonically (there is a slight loss of fidelity) but when audio is sonically undesirable to begin with, the fidelity loss is really minimal and hardly noticeable.

When transferring the 8-track stuff, a problem was in play. Here’s the story. Del Casher has an 8-track 1” recorder and he was kind enough to let me transfer the tapes to digital land. Sadly, his recorder is rarely used and one of the tracks did not playback on his machine.

I then went on the hunt to rent an 8-track but no luck for a few days so I decided to figure out a work-around. When at Del’s home studio, he played a half inch 4-track tape on his 8-track 1” recorder. My first thought was the guides will not hold the tape in place BUT the sonics did not seem to change meaning the tape seemed to play OK without the proper half inch tape guides. With that in mind, here’s what transpired next.

So why not use the same concept playing the 1” 8-track tape on a 2” tape machine.

OK, I got to work dealing with 1” tape playing on a 2” machine. There is an inch between guides allowing for a wide tape skew area as the tape goes through the machine path. The "capstan" and the "pinch roller" wants to "pull up" the 1” tape on my machine so the idea is to not let the tape ‘ride up’ on the heads by keeping tape level in the path (as tape guides perform).

After many experiments, while playing the tape (for the digital transfer to Pro Tools), I ended up holding two Q-Tips (using a cotton end) on top of the 1” tape on the inside of the 1st and 2nd tape guides as to create an "even tape flow" across the "head stack". As the tape plays, a very steady hand is needed applying very light pressure on top of the tape but keeping in mind to not force the tape to drift upwards or downwards on the recorder heads. This takes time to get the feel and is "hit and miss" with each playback/transfer pass.

(Keep in mind the 8-track transfers have the same track concept layout as 16-track tape played on a 24-track machine meaning 1/3rd of the tracks are supposed to be blank tracks (8 tracks spread over 12 tracks).

After being as careful as possible with the Q-Tip technique, the tape skewed up slightly on the recorder heads leading to audio showing up on blank adjacent tracks. The fix here was to blend the main tracks and the tracks that had the occasional audio information. When setting both recorder tracks to the same levels on the mixer, when the tape skewed, the make-up gain from the level drop of one track, and the make-up gain addition of the other, a workable sonic situation. Note that when the skewing was happening, there was a slightly noticeable frequency shift meaning the sound slightly darkens up for a moment. I did my best to use audio tricks as to help the audio flow through the transition.

The bottom line on this subject is experienced recording engineers think through/experiment trying all thought of possibilities hopefully leading to a workable solution. In the ever-changing world of computer based audio recorders, the possibilities for new avenues appear often! Great news for the never-ending problems that occur in the studio.


Recording gear history

Yea, I mentioned the record formats but here are the full details. The multi track recorders used were/are one of the following: 4-track, 8-track, 16-track, or 24-track analog recorders.

Sony 854-4S 4-track recorder: I bought it new in the very early 70’s. At the time, I thought it was incredible! By today’s standards, yea, sonically terrible BUT how about this — the machine still works! Yea, I should "knock on wood". A funny story regarding the recorder when reading details regarding the "Sony Jingle".

3M 56 8-track recorder: I purchased the recorder from John Kay (from the band Steppenwolf). My good friend, Bobby Cochran was the guitarist in band at the time and he told me John was about to sell his 8-track since he bought a16 track machine. John’s 8-track was like new and I happily bought the recorder! (When moving on to a 16-track recorder noted next, I sold the recorder to Al McKay (the original guitarist in Earth Wind and Fire and an old friend).

3M 56 16-track recorder: I bought this machine from Ike Turner’s studio. Even though the machine had major use, it was mostly reliable. Hey, I was so happy to have so many available tracks!

3M 24-track recorder: I bought this recorder through Phil Kay. Phil is an old pal and owned a studio (Jennifudy) at the time and helped me get a deal. A good sounding recorder.

More on 24-track recorders later if I end up releasing further CD’s from the 80s and 90s.


Mixes

The work is taken me many months and by far the most difficult mixing project to date! Without Pro Tools, at least 90% of the sonic help would not have occurred. Adding (not replacing) a sampled snare drum and kick drum, automating EQ moves, etc., really helped make the stuff sound sonically presentable.

Keep in mind that analog tape is noisy especially with ballads since recorded levels start very low and increase as the song builds in volume. Engineers set the recording levels while the musicians are playing at the loudest level for the song. The noise factor is also increased by the fact all of the new mixes need help in the treble frequencies thus adding more noise — bringing up the EQ level in treble frequencies also brings up the tape "hiss" level (yea, annoying).

So when mixing, I did my best to pull back the noise (tape hiss) with very careful muting/fader rides on the analog Neve V2 recording console (with Flying Faders automation), along with "level ramps" in Pro Tools. Gates were rarely used (only if needed). One-way "noise reduction" plug-ins were used if absolutely needed (such tools may hurt the overall bandwidth of the instruments/vocal(s) if not very careful when adjusting settings. No matter what, there is a trade off in sonic land).


Mixing concept

So when starting the project, I needed to decide on a sonic concept. Two basic ideas came to mind as a general rule of thumb — make it melodically sweet or compress the crap out of it (as in this era of aggressive pop). The decision was easy — the audience for this album would like to hear performances that have dynamics instead of one constant pounding level.

I also did my best to make the stuff sound thick (warm) on ballads for a sweet sound. There are some up-tempo songs that are very "mid-range" bright — that could not be helped as just dealing with poorly recorded material.

(Note when searching for the tapes, I had found the multi-track tapes for most of the songs. Only two songs were transferred from a 2-track tape (Secret Love and I Fall In Love Every Day). Yea, that put me in a position of just mastering those songs using many tricks as to help).


Instrument Details

Tracks that included a Fender Rhodes Electric Piano

(Note there are two basic Fender Rhodes models. One is the "Suitcase" and the other is the "Stage" model.)

In most cases, the Fender Rhodes used on the recordings was a "stage model" which I had bought in the 70s. Sadly, when purchasing the Rhodes, I did not know that the "suitcase" model is far superior sonically (especially for recording). The suitcase model included a pre-amp section that has tone controls most needed as to brighten up the treble frequencies. The Stage model is mushy sounding and lacks treble frequencies. Since the signal is dark, hard to brighten up in treble frequencies. I have done my best to "EQ" the signal as to make it brighter without bring up too much tape hiss (caused by adding upper treble frequencies).

In most cases, the Fender Rhodes was recorded "mono". In such cases, I decided to duplicate the track and on the copied track, I used a PRO TOOLS "pitch shifting" program plug-in (+7 cents sharp) as to spread the sound in stereo (Left and Right).

(Note when mixing the original demos many years ago, I spread out the Rhodes in stereo using a "Boss Chorus". Very noisy but a nice sound).

Tracks that Included Synthesizer Strings and Synth Pads

(Note the Synth strings were generated from an ARP 2600 and typically played by David Foster. As I work on this stuff, the parts David played are melodic ear candy as usual!

Since many of the songs were recorded using the 16 track 2” format, since limited tracks in that era, the synth strings were recorded on 4 or 5 recorder tracks and then "bounced" (mixed together) to one recorder track. For the new mixes, I used a mono to stereo computer plug-in as to spread out the frequencies in a fake stereo fashion.

(I seem to remember the original demo mixes string parts were spread out in stereo using a 910 Harmonizer. The 910 Harmonizer was a great leap in audio effect land but occasional serious data glitches leading to a "thump" type of sound when crossing a data seam). I could have used a Harmonizer 4000 for the new mixes as to make a stereo spread but actually better to use the "plug-in" as it spreads out frequencies from left to right.

Tracks that Included Mono Guitar Parts

There is one or two mixes that included a mono guitar part (in the song chorus) that were intended to be spread in stereo. In those cases, I used the same pseudo stereo "plug-in" as to spread out.


Guitars and Amps

For those of you that care what gear I used, here we go.

The main guitar used was a 1963 Gibson ES335 with block inlays. I played this guitar for many recordings in the 70s. (This guitar is shown on the artwork - Webmaster's remark)

On the song "I Fall In Love Every Day" I used a 1968 Gibson 345. (I sold the guitar to Ben Benay at some point in time).

On the songs that have a "Strat sound", that guitar is a prototype built by Yamaha in the mid 70s. A good guitar built in the "Strat fashion" but with a "Gibson" scale.

Regarding amps, the odds are good the guitar amp used on most stuff was a Fender Deluxe (early 70s) highly modified by Paul Rivera. I may have used a 2/12 Fender Bassman piggy-back (1962) and may have used a Fender 4/10 Bassman (1956).


Songs and Full Details

All songs mixed and/or mastered by Jay Graydon at Garden Rake Studios.

    1. IF THERE'S A WAY (3:04)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Vocals, Guitars, and Synths: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Jeff Porcaro
  • Bass: Dave McDaniel
  • Arranged by: Jay Graydon
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon
Recording Studio(s)

The odds are good all was recorded in my studio of the era in the late 70s. The original recording format was 2” tape recorded on a 3M 56 16-track recorder.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The mixer was a Quantum (I think). A simple mixer with 16 inputs but sounded good for a mid line mixer. The original recording format was 1” tape recorded on an 8 -track 3M 56 recorder (my first ‘Pro Recorder’).

Details and Memories

The demo was recorded in the mid 70s. It was one of the first songs recorded on the 8-track. I was in the early stages of getting into miking techniques and learning how to "EQ" (set the "tone" controls for each recorded instrument and vocal). Further, the microphones I owned at the time did not include the good mikes of the era. Oh well. I worked with what I had.

Keep in mind that with 8-track recording, since so few tracks (it seemed a lot back then), "track bouncing" (combining instruments) was a major part of the process. I remember that I had first recorded everything but drums using a "click" as the tempo track. I most likely started with Rhythm Guitars (three parts I think) and then bounced down to two tracks leading to a permanent sub mix on two tracks. That equals three tracks so far.

Since there are four synth "pad" parts played one at a time on an Arp 2600, since I needed to bounce to one track, that must have occurred next. That would make four tracks total so far.

The vocal would most likely have been recorded next. In the choruses the vocal was doubled so I had to bounce two vocal tracks to one track (or at least mixed the two chorus tracks back to the main vocal track. That totals five tracks so far. (Btw, the vocal sound sonically is awful — major 2 kHz pain as usual for the era (I "rolled out" (took away) as much as possible) and in this case, the mic I used (I can’t remember what it was) did not allow sweet upper frequencies and simply sounds non-hi-fi. Oh well).

OK, three tracks left. (The click track would eventually get erased but not sure when that happened allowing another open track). The odds are good Dave McDaniel played the bass part next (he sounds great as always). That would leave only two open tracks.

One of two things happened next. I either recorded the melody line guitar part or Jeff overdubbed the drums. If I did record the guitar first, I erased the click before Jeff overdubbed the drums. If so, not a smart move but in that era, I was learning. After more thought, I am fairly sure Jeff did overdub last (two tracks for drums) since the click was bounced to other tracks for the count off only.

All eight tracks were used so time to do a rough mix. I have that two-track mix and it sounds terrible.

As in most cases with the 8-track tape stuff, the sonics are simply terrible. The drums sound like cardboard, the vocal track is loaded with 2.5 kHz pain on the vocal, and the rest is simply not good. I spent weeks fixing this track sonically working on the sounds in Pro Tools.

There is no doubt Jeff Porcaro was one of the best drummers in any era! I remember calling him and asking if he would come to my home studio and overdub drums. Within an hour, Jeff showed up and we got to work.

I was once a drummer (my first instrument and I was not good). I had a Camco drum set in my studio ready to record (mike stands and cables set and just needing to place the mikes in the mic stand holders). Jeff simply adjusted the set and tuned, I positioned the mikes, set the levels, and started recording.

After one pass, the only direction noted was to play a high-hat disco thing in the choruses. Jeff added and we recorded. Probably one take and two at the most. Clearly Jeff plays his ass off on this track (as well as all the other songs he played on).

Artist(s) that recorded the song:

Maureen McGovern (on CBS) recorded the song in 1978, but the record company never released her album.
Waters - I seem to remember that the Waters (on Warner Bros.) recorded the song.


    2. WHAT GOOD IS LOVE (3:22)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Vocals and Background vocal arrangement: Bill Champlin
  • Guitars: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Willy Ornelas
  • Bass: (Most likely David Hungate)
  • Fender Rhodes: Greg Mathieson
  • Produced and arranged by Jay Graydon
Recording Studio(s)

The odds are good all was recorded in my studio of the era in the late 70s.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The mixer was a Quantum (I think). A simple mixer with 16 inputs but sounded good for a mid line mixer. The original recording format was 2” tape recorded on a 16 -track 3M 56 recorder.

Details and Memories

The odds are good I started writing the song with the guitar parts in mind. I assume I was in writing mode and played the intro guitar line and then the chords that immediately follow in the intro. I seem to remember the rest of the song was written fairly quickly and I then brought Harry Garfield in as to write the lyric.

The demo is so much fun! As always, Bill sings his ass off and the band is happening! Note that Bill sings all the background vocals (he calls himself, "The Champlettes"). Note his falsetto voice on the high parts — strong like a full voice sound, which is not typical.

Artist(s) that recorded the song

Bill Champlin - the song was re-recorded for Bill Champlin’s album,
Single and is great! All in all, both versions have major energy and quality musicality of the era.


    3. YOU CAN COUNT ON ME (4:01)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Vocals, Acoustic Guitars, Synth Strings programming: Jay Graydon
  • Background Vocals, Yamaha Electric Piano, Fender Rhodes and Synth Strings: David Foster
  • Drums: Mike Baird
  • Bass: Not sure but probably Mike Porcaro.
  • Arranged by David Foster
  • Produced by Jay Graydon
Recording Studio(s)

The odds are good all was recorded in my studio of the era in the late 70s.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The mixer was a Quantum (I think). A simple mixer with 16 inputs but sounded good for a mid line mixer. The original recording format was 2” tape recorded on a 16 -track 3M 56 recorder.

Details and Memories

I love this song as a solid melody, sweet chord changes, and a great lyric! There are a number of lyric "Money Lines" (jargon for a marketing selling point). For example, the 2nd line states, "No one loves enough, that’s my feeling". What a great thought. Harry Garfield nailed the lyric for this song!

As I write about details for this song, the workload is going to be tough regarding a good sonic mix since just starting to work on it noting all kinds of sonic problems. No matter since I will shape as good as possible taking the necessary time.

Artist(s) that recorded the song

Cory Wells - You Can Count On Me/Let Tomorrow Be - 7-inch vinyl - A&M AM - 2060 - 1978


    4. YOU'RE MY DAY (2:54)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Vocal: Lisa DalBello
  • Electric guitar(s), Synth Strings,and Synth programming: Jay Graydon
  • Piano, Fender Rhodes: David Foster
  • Drums: Jeff Porcaro
  • Bass: Most likely David Hungate
  • Arranged by: David Foster and Jay Graydon
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon

Recording Studio(s)

The tracking session was surely recorded in live sounding studio since there is major distant drum leakage heard in the acoustic piano mics. That means the acoustic piano was recorded during the basic track recording and then David overdubbed the Fender Rhodes. I have decided to not use the acoustic piano in the mix since the piano sound is most difficult to make sound good with so much drum leakage — all EQ moves tried are of no help. Oh well. The good news is the piano part is not really needed. Not sure of the tracking studio but it might have been Western (Studio 1) in Hollywood, CA. The overdubs were recorded in my studio of the era.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The original recording format was 2” tape recorded on a 16-track recorder. The overdubs were recorded on a 3M 56 16-track recorder. In my studio, the mixer was a Quantum (I think).

Details and Memories

Since recording 16 track, it was typical to record the drums on four tracks. One track for the snare drum, one track for the bass, and two tracks (split left and right for the stereo effect) for the tom toms, high hat, and cymbals.

For some reason, the drums were recorded on three tracks. The snare drum was included in the two tracks that had everything but the bass drum singled out on a separate recorder track. As usual of the era, the drum sounds are not good by today’s standards. On some of the songs (including this one), I have added a sampled snare drum and bass drum using various techniques. (Note I also used the original snare and bass drum in the mix. The sampled sounds are to help the body added to their original counterparts.)

Such work is a huge time burner but in the case of this song, much more difficult since the snare was included on the stereo drum mix tracks. A boring story for another time.

As noted, I arranged and played the Synth Strings on this song. The sound is not good as too much wide spread pitch on each string part. Keep in mind these were demos were recorded quickly — just got a quick sound set up and recorded. I pulled the string parts back in the mix as to not make annoying with the wide pitch spread. After stating the sounds recorded are not good, the bass sound is spectacular! David Hungate always had a great sound (big and "note" defined) but on this track, the sound is huge which is not typical as David is playing the thumb bounce and finger pull technique. Such a style of playing is typically a very treble sound with very little low frequencies (the strings are hit/pulled in a way that creates mostly upper harmonics leading to a lack of low frequencies. For some reason, the bass track has serious low frequencies as well as a good blend of upper harmonics!!!

OK, enough technical stuff so time for some thoughts about the song.

Disco lives. An endeavor as to place a "Disco" song of the era. Sadly never recorded as a master (as far as I remember). During that time, Lisa was recording an album produced by David and I assume we recorded the track after recording a master for someone else. (In that era, we recorded all we could as free time permitted meaning after finishing a tracking date, if the studio an engineer were going to be paid to the following hour, we used the time for a quick track).

Artist(s) that recorded the song

Maureen McGovern (on CBS) recorded the song in 1978, but the record company never released her album.
Cory Wells - Touch Me - A&M - AMLH - 64673 SP-4673 - 1978 Cory's version also released on a compilation album - Light Mellow AOR-Groovin' & Breezin' / Universal Music Edition (Compilation by various artists) - Universal Music, Japan - UICY-4016 - 2000


    5. SHOULD WE CARRY ON (3:56)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster, B. J. Cook Foster
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI), Cotaba (SOCAN)
  • Vocals, Guitars, Bass, and Synthesizer programming: Jay Graydon
  • Fender Rhodes, Synthesizer strings: David Foster
  • Drums: Mike Baird
  • Arranged by David Foster and Jay Graydon
  • Produced by Jay Graydon and David Foster
This was the song that got Airplay a record deal with RCA! Tommy Mottola was managing "Hall and Oates" at the time and David was producing an album for them when we recorded the demo. David gave Tommy the demo and the deal fell into place!

Recording Studio(s)

The odds are good all was recorded in my studio of the era somewhere around 1978 or 1979.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The mixer was a Quantum (I think). The original recording format was 2” tape recorded on a 16 -track 3M 56 recorder.

Details and Memories

David and I wrote the at least half of the song on a break when recording as studio musicians for Maureen McGovern at Dawnbreaker studios (San Fernando, CA). Btw, during that session, Maureen recorded a song I had co-written entitled, "You're My Day", which is track #4 on this album as demoed by Lisa DalBello. Maureen's version for CBS was unfortunately never released.

When the session was over, David and I drove to my house/studio as to finish writing the chord changes and melody. That night we may have recorded the Fender Rhodes part to a "click" and then overdubbed the rest of the instruments/vocals later. If not, we recorded the basic track a few days later.

The drum sound on this song is not good (my fault for working too quickly in demo land in those days). Using Pro Tools Sound Replacer, I added a sampled snare and sampled kick. The key is too also use the original snare and kick as well in the mix as to keep the "Feel" in place. Full explanation at some point on the site.

Note most of the other instrument sounds and vocal sound required major EQ work both in the Neve console and in Pro Tools.

Artist(s) that recorded the song

Airplay obviously, now available in the 25th Anniversary edition.
Nigel Olsson - Changing Tides - Epic - 84360 - 1980


    6. SECRET LOVE (3:39)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster, Marc Jordan
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI), Mortgage (SOCAN)
  • Vocal: Marc Jordan
  • Electric Guitars, Synth Strings programming: Jay Graydon
  • Fender Rhodes and Synth Strings: David Foster
  • Drums: Jeff Porcaro
  • Bass: Probably David Hungate.
  • Arranged by David Foster
  • Produced by Jay Graydon and David Foster
Recording Studio(s)

Probably my studio of the era, but not sure as I only have a two-track "rough mix" tape to work with.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

Probably a MCI 528 mixer and probably recorded on a 3M 79 24-track recorder.

Details and Memories

Since all I had to work with was a 2-track mix, as noted, the sounds are sonically good but some rough mix problems leading to three drawbacks in the mix.

1. The vocal level is sometimes too low and sometimes is slightly too loud. The low vocal level needed help so in Pro Tools, I duplicated the stereo mix track and added some mid range EQ as to open up the vocal. Gladly, that addition of that EQ did not hurt the other instruments within the performance.

2. Sometimes the snare drum is very loud. Exciting in any case. Note that in one place in the song Jeff misses the snare and hits the rim (either that or hits the two sticks together). No doubt that was an accident but after hearing it over and over, I like it!

3. The Fender Rhodes is very low in level especially in the intro. Oh well.

Marc is a great singer and has great pitch! The vocal has a few pitch problems and his voice was a bit tired slightly cracking once or twice. I would have not let that slide if a master but keep in mind, just recording demos. One thing that is priceless is Marc hiccuped during the interlude. So why did I not mute that noise when I mixed the rough mix many years ago? That and so many other issues lead to the fact I was too busy working on master projects. The good news is you get to hear non-polished stuff in pop land for a change.

As usual, David nailed a great arrangement — David is so very creative!!! I humbly state my little guitar part in the verses is fairly good. I first thought it was Larry Carlton.

Artist(s) that recorded the song

Mariya Takeuchi - Miss M - RCA (BMG Victor) - BVCR-2514 - 1982


    7. SHE WAITS FOR ME (3:32)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Vocals, Guitars, and Synth Bass: Jay Graydon
  • Piano: Greg Mathieson
  • Drums: Mike Baird
  • Arranged by: Jay Graydon
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon
Recording Studio(s)

My home studio of the era.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

Th mixer was a Quantum (I think). A simple mixer with 16 inputs but sounded good for a mid line mixer. The original recording format was 1” tape recorded on an 8 -track 3M 56 recorder.

Details and Possible Memories

The demo was recorded in the mid 70s. It was recorded before "If There’s a Way" as this is the first song on the tape reel with "If There’s a Way" as the third track on the tape.

Many technical details are the same as noted for the song "If There’s a Way", so no need to reiterate.

Sonically, this track is really hurting in its recorded form. Also, some of the levels (such as the vocal) were recorded too low meaning not taking advantage of the signal to noise ratio (Stupid).

Just starting to work on the song as I write and will do my best to make it sound as good as possible.

The piano used was an upright piano I had bought from my childhood friend, John Hoehn (John and I are still good friends). The piano was in my living room and as most old pianos go, I am actually impressed that it sounds kind of acceptable for an upright piano. The piano was in my living room and I had to run long wires for the mikes and headphones from the studio upstairs.

Artist(s) that recorded the song

Airplay obviously, now available in the 25th Anniversary edition.


    8. THROW A LITTLE BIT OF LOVE MY WAY (4:19)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Vocals: Ed Whiting
  • Bass guitar and Synthesizer programming: Jay Graydon
  • Piano, Fender Rhodes, synthesizer strings and pad: David Foster
  • Drums: Willy Ornelas
  • Arranged by David Foster and Jay Graydon
  • Produced by Jay Graydon
Recording Studio(s)

Most likely Larry Carlton’s home studio for the tracking session. All other work was performed at my home studio of the era.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

I can’t visualize/remember Larry’s recording console and recorder. Maybe a MCI 528 console. Co-engineered by me and Larry and probably Steve Carlton as 2nd engineer. 16 track recorded on 2” tape.

Details and Memories

The tracking date must have just been Drums, Piano and Fender Rhodes (or possibly Fender Rhodes first, then piano). I also sang a rough vocal during the tracking date as melody guide but that track had been erased when needing to open up tracks for overdubs (I discovered that when hearing a track that had been "punched in" on leaving a very small part of the vocal. Working too fast as usual in that era when doing demos. I should have cleaned up (erased) the left over vocal stuff).

When working in my studio, the first thing I would have done is to play the bass part. Not sure if the strings and synths or vocals were recorded next.

During overdubs, my 16-track tape machine malfunctioned causing damage to the tape. The "Take Up" reel motor stopped spinning causing the tape to become wrapped up between the capstan and pinch roller. I hit "Stop" on the tape machine, jumped up from the chair behind the console, and ran over to the machine to grab the spilling tape reel. After the technical problem was fixed, I played the tape and heard a crunching sound for about two beats in either the first or 2nd verse (that was the first mix on this project and I no longer remember which verse). When transferring the tape to Pro Tools, I soloed every track as to find where the noise was most prevalent. To my surprise, the only track that showed the noise in a big way was my bass track.

Since using Pro Tools, I tried to chop out the crackling noise but not possible without destroying the bass note. I tried other fixes but not believable so the last resort was to play the one long bass note more than 30 years later using the same bass (and probably the same direct box I found in a pile of old stuff). The strings on my 1964 Fender Precision bass have not been changed for at least 20 years and I did not have a new set on hand. In either case, no way to match the sound for many reasons. I got as close as possible and in the mix, hard to notice.

More on the bass part. My bass-playing career was with one band in 1966. After that gig ended, the bass gathered dust.

I played bass on this song as to quickly finish the demo. I thought I remembered recording the bass in "one pass" but after examination of the bass track, there were two ‘punch ins’. My performance was hardly passable but I did not care at the time since just a demo, as I was very busy playing record dates, writing, etc.

Since working with Pro Tools, I decided how to learn to "slip" around notes as to achieve a better "feel/performance". Yea, this is standard practice in this era so might was well get into the concept. Note I rarely "slipped" notes "in time" unless really needed.

I have always loved this song!

Artist(s) that recorded the song

Bloodstone - Don't Stop Motown, Universal, Japan - 12097, UPC Code 498800537952 - 1979, 2005
Barry Crocker - No Regrets - Astor Control, Australia - ALPS-1055 - 1977
Waters - Watercolors - Arista - AB 4253 - 1980
Cory Wells - Touch Me - A&M - AMLH 64673 Sp-4673 - 1978
Stevie Woods - Take Me To Your Heaven - Cotillion - ??? - 1981


    9. I FALL IN LOVE EVERY DAY (3:21)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Vocal: Tata Vega
  • Electric and Acoustic guitars and Synth programming: Jay Graydon
  • Fender Rhodes and Synth licks (at fade start): Greg Mathieson
  • Drums: Ralph Humphrey
  • Bass: Dave McDaniel
  • Arranged by: Jay Graydon
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon
Recording Studio(s)

The first official Garden Rake Studios (a bedroom and living room in the first house I rented).

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The recorder used was a 4-track Sony (model 854-4s) — an affordable milestone for home recording! A 1/4” tape format. The mixers were Sony mixers (I have forgotten the model numbers). The odds are good the only outboard EQ was a passive unit designed by Paul Grupp. It is possible a URIE 1176 Compressor and an old LANG EQ my have been used for the vocal and other instruments.

The recording took place in the very early 70s (possibly 1973). This was one of the first recordings on the 4-track learning how to record and mix with mostly lo-fi gear.

Details and Memories

When going through tapes for this project, I couldn’t locate the 4-track master but found a rough mix 2-track tape. This recording is a sonic nightmare but I have done my best as to make it sound good. The drums sound like cardboard and are buried! The vocal (in high-energy spots) has a huge tonal spike (around 2.5 kHz) sounding similar to the pain of someone scratching fingernails on a blackboard! That needed to be "pulled back" but at the expense of other instruments wanting that sonic area.

As to shape sonically, using Pro Tools, I duplicated the stereo rough mix twice-totaling three stereo mix tracks.

On the main stereo track, as mentioned I rolled out around 6 dB around 2.5 kHz. I added about 6 dB at 10 kHz and 1 dB around 100 cycles.

One duplicated stereo track was used as to set up an EQ as to bump up the low mid-range (the meat of the vocal and instruments added in to taste). I added around 4 dB at 300 cycles. I rolled off all the low frequencies from around 150 cycles and below as to avoid low-end build up.

The other duplicated stereo track used for a plug-in that allows for phase to be messed with shifting information past typical "Left and Right" imaging leading to a wider stereo image. This seemed to be a good addition as it made the drums and acoustic guitars jump out a taste. The Fender Rhodes piano was also louder (too much) but at least it helped the instrumental support.

Gladly the bass part was very forward sounding to begin with. Dave McDaniel is a great bassist and a perfect fit for my music of the era!!! Note the melodic "step out" melodic line near the end of the song!!!

Regarding the vocal, dig Tata!!! She is clearly a great singer and so vocally mature at a young age!!! She once met Stevie Wonder (at Motown in Hollywood). Tata sang a few "licks" and Stevie stated, "You sing like me." She is such a talented singer!!!

At the beginning of the fade, Greg Mathieson played synth fills. After the part was recorded, I ran it through the "Yap-a-Yo Tube" unit. More on this effect at some point on my web site. This sound inspired Tata to do her adlib in the same section working off Greg’s lines. She emulated the sound of the "Yap-a-Yo" Tube". A very cool vocal sound!!!

David Foster’s first big time production was the JP Morgan album recorded in 1976 (now once again available in Japan). This song opens JP’s album with a great arrangement by David!!! JP emulated Tata’s vocal "scat", and did a good job doing so.

Artist(s) that recorded the song

Jaisun - I Fall In Love Every Day/Try And Understand - (45rpm) Jett Sett - JS101 - 1977
J. P. Morgan - Jaye P. Morgan - Condor, Dreamsville Records Japan - C1001, YDCD-0023 - 1977, 2000


    10. LOVE FLOWS (4:10)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Vocal: Ed Whiting
  • Piano: David Foster
  • Drums: Jeff Porcaro
  • Bass: David Hungate
  • Arranged by: David Foster
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon and David Foster
Recording Studio(s)

Not sure where we recorded the track (maybe Sunset Sound) but the odds are good Humberto Gatica engineered the tracking date as noted by his tracking layout (a bottom Snare mic track) and his sonics. Hum is a very good engineer and the basic track sounds are good.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The original recording format was 2” tape recorded on a 24 -track recorder. The vocal was recorded on a 3M 79 24-track recorder at my studio of the era.

Details and Possible Memories

I first thought the track may have been recorded for AIRPLAY but that is not possible since Ed Whiting sang the vocal and Ed was not in the band. We probably recorded the demo as to consider for AIRPLAY but did not re-record as a master since we had enough ballads to choose from.

It makes sense this song was not recorded as a master for others reasons as well. The song continues to "modulate" going up a half step in each chorus during the out-chorus section. On the "bonus" version, you hear David stating something like, "We painted ourselves into a corner". What he was saying is the continued modulations were increasing the vocal range past a range of most singers. Since this song was way out of my vocal range and since Tommy Funderburk was one of the singers in AIRPLAY, he could have easily dealt with the high vocal range leading to the fact this song was not recorded as an AIRPLAY master.

I assume the song was either recorded as a demo for Ed Whiting (looking for a record deal), or simply a demo as to place with a recording artist.

Foster, Porcaro and Hungate playing great as usual! Ed Whiting is a great singer! Note that Ed’s performance was recorded quickly — just a few punch-ins! He gets out of vocal range during the last chorus round but his soul comes through big time!

The work on this mix was as usual working with the sonics of the era that I recorded (the vocal in this case). Within the vocal high tenor range area (in the choruses), the vocal sonics are loaded with the ear pain area of 2,000 to 4,000 cycles! (I wish I had bought some tube microphones in the era but I had not yet learned sonically sweet mikes are so very important for a source that is loaded with the upper mid range bite!!!). Ok, the work was to pull back the sonic pain (and add upper low frequencies as to balance). Such work takes major time as to average out a sonic flow from beginning to end. (This type of work was needed in most of the songs).

Artist(s) that recorded the song

None.


BONUS SONGS

    11. LOVE FLOWS - melody guide version (4:23)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Guide Vocal Track: Jay Graydon and David Foster
  • Piano: David Foster
  • Drums: Jeff Porcaro
  • Bass: David Hungate
  • Arranged by: David Foster
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon and David Foster

The same information as the above with the following changes.

Here is a mix that eliminates Ed’s vocal and has a guide vocal track recorded by David and me. We recorded the guide track directly after recording the basic instrumental track. This shows how David and I recorded melody guides and ideas.

You will also hear the recorded stuff before the song starts. As soon as the analog tape recorder was in motion (during the basic track recording), the first thing you will notice is the instrument pitch starts high and quickly ramps down — that is caused by the recorder (in record mode) starting from a "dead stop". During playback, the sound is "pitched" high and quickly slips down to normal (becoming stable in pitch land).

So in this mix I "cranked up" David and me singing a guide melody and talking about the melodic ideas as to paint the melodic picture. You will note David outlined the orchestral stuff. Sadly, never recorded as a master but the good news is this version exists!!!


    12. TED'S THEME #2 - without Ted's "Rap" (1:05)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI)
  • (Not sure who wrote the lyrics. We will eventually find out. The same for the rest of the Ted songs)
  • Vocals: The odds are good the singers are Nettie Gloud and Carmen Twillie
  • Fender Rhodes Piano and Synth Strings: David Foster
  • Synth Strings programming: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Mike Baird
  • Bass: Sadly, I do not remember BUT possibly David Shields
  • Arranged by: David Foster
  • Produced by: David Foster and Jay Graydon

Recording Studio(s)

My home studio of the era.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The mixer was most likely the Quantum. The original recording format was 2” tape recorded on a 16 -track 3M 56 recorder.

Details and Memories

This song was one of two demos for the theme for a Ted Knight TV show. I seem to remember the show did not happen. For those of you not familiar with Ted Knight, he was a great comedy actor playing a buffoon quite often. His performance in the movie "CADDY SHACK" is outstanding!

In any case, in the late 70s, the same guy that managed David and I, managed Ted. We were asked to write songs for the theme and yea, they just ended up as demos going nowhere. The good news is the tape has survived time for all to enjoy.

Artist(s) that recorded the song

None, as simply a TV theme written for a specific purpose.


    13. TED'S THEME #2 - with Ted's "Rap" (1:05)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI)
The same as the above but with "Ted’s Rap" included.

So after we recorded the track and vocals, Ted arrived at my studio not knowing what he should do. David and I simply mentioned to have fun and say funny things working off the lyrics. Ted was quick and nailed it!!!

Could the two Ted Theme’s be the first "Rap" songs?


    14. TED'S THEME #1 (1:23)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI)
  • Vocals: Bill Champlin for sure and most likely Nettie Gloud and Carmen Twillie
  • Fender Rhodes Piano and Synth Strings: David Foster
  • Rhythm Guitar and Synth Strings programming: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Mike Baird
  • Bass: Sadly, I do not remember but possibly David Shields (he was the funk energy bassist of the era that "Thumb Slapped, Pulled and Hammered" the strings as featured in this song). The odds are good the same bass player played on both versions (meaning Ted’s theme 2 as well).
  • Arranged by: David Foster
  • Produced by: David Foster and Jay Graydon
Recording Studio(s)

My home studio of the era.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The mixer was most likely the Quantum. The original recording format was 2” tape recorded on a 16 -track 3M 56 recorder.

Details and Memories

This song was one of two demos for the theme for a Ted Knight TV show. I seem to remember the show did not come to fruition.

For those of you not familiar with Ted Knight, he was a great comedic actor playing a buffoon quite often. His performance in the movie "CADDY SHACK" remains outstanding!

Yea, as mentioned with the other Ted theme, in the late 70s, the same guy that managed David and I, managed Ted. We were asked to write songs for the theme and yea, they just ended up as demos going nowhere. The good news is the tape has survived time for all to enjoy.

So when starting to work on the song in "Sonic Help/Mix land", I quickly realized there were two sets of stereo vocal tracks. When listening to Ted’s "rap" (not included in this version) it became obvious which vocal tracks set to use as the version.

Artist(s) that recorded the song

None.


    15. TED'S THEME #1 - with Ted's "Rap" (1:23)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI)
  • Vocals: Bill Champlin for sure and most likely Nettie Gloud and Carmen Twillie
  • Fender Rhodes Piano and Synth Strings: David Foster
  • Rhythm Guitar and Synth Strings programming: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Mike Baird
  • Bass: Sadly, I do not remember but possibly David Shields (he was the funk energy bassist of the era that "Thumb Slapped, Pulled and Hammered" the strings as featured in this song). The odds are good the same bass player played on both versions (meaning Ted’s theme 2 as well).
  • Arranged by: David Foster
  • Produced by: David Foster and Jay Graydon
The same as the above but with "Ted’s Rap" included in the mix.


    16. TED'S THEME #1 - only the tail of Ted's "Rap" (0:22)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, David Foster
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Foster Frees (BMI)
This version is to show Ted was having much fun when doing the rap. I only included the last few lines as to set up the fact the last lyric line states, "OK, you’re are ugly." A TV network executive (as noted by Ted) would obviously never approve that line and rightly so.

Note that the guy laughing is David. David was in the studio with Ted as to point out spots in the song for Ted’s on-the-spot humorous ideas.


    17. SONY JINGLE (1:09)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Vocals: Tata Vega
  • Guitars and synths: Jay Graydon
  • Bass: Dave McDaniel
  • Arranged and produced by: Jay Graydon
Recording Studio(s)

My home studio of the era.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The mixer was a Quantum (I think). A simple mixer with 16 inputs but sounded good for a mid line mixer. The original recording format was 1” tape recorded on an 8 -track 3M 56 recorder.

Details and Memories

Before acquiring the 3M 8-track recorder, I was using a mid-line Sony 4-track recorder (model 854-4s) — the best 4-track mid-line home studio recorder of the era.

Around two years after owning the recorder I had taken the machine to Sony for repair (a crackle noise problem on one track). When picking up the recorder, I tested using headphones before leaving (a logical concept). The crackle noise problem was still in play!!! I asked to speak with the tech. He said there was no problem so I asked if we could bench test in his workstation. The recorder was set on the workbench and he patched the recorder output cables into his mixer as to test through an amplifier. The tech says, listen, there is no crackling! I STATED HE WAS CORRECT BUT THE ONLY WAY TO CHECK AUDIO IS TO TURN ON THE RECORDER POWER SWITCH!!!!!!!!!!! HE HAD NOT POWERED UP THE RECORDER!!!!!!!!!!

I was pissed off as the recorder had been in the repair shop for more than two weeks and was not fixed! I asked to speak with the person in charge and when speaking with fellow, I asked him to have his best tech perform the fix. (That happened and all was well a few days later but not the following before leaving).

Before all this happened in the Sony repair shop, while standing in line, I rambled on and on that the 854-4s was a great recorder (but I did not have a pro recorder to compare to so my rap was simply enthusiastic). The guy in line next to me stated "Yea, but if you keep it powered up around the clock [24 hours a day], it will fail." I never did so as always best to power off gear when not in use (heat is usually the cause of electronic component life failure).

The guy may have been right but what he would have never considered is the 854-4s is still functioning after the mentioned repair of more than thirty years ago!!! I used it a month ago and the machine was functioning perfectly.

What is most strange is the recorder has been powered up a few times since around 1973 — not powering up for years at a time typically leads to mechanical and electronic problems. The bottom line here is the 854-4s was built to last most likely using near military specs!

So back to the fellow that ran the Sony repair shop. During the conversation, I noted I would co-write (with Harry Garfield) and record a "jingle" for Sony. I noted something like he could submit the jingle and he would look good if the song were picked up as to use. At the time, I had no idea how to promote songs so just a long shot.

The fellow offered to give me a C-500 microphone and 2-track recorder (both top of the Sony line at the time). I received the stuff and surely used for the recording process. The funny part is the guy called me a few months later asking I return the gear, which I did. The reason for the return of the gear, is suspect.

Regarding the jingle, the instruments (except the synth strings) were recorded and then bounced onto two tracks. Three guitars (two acoustic and one electric rhythm), bass, and some silly drum box sound used similar to a click track. Thankfully, the bass was mixed loud when doing the two-track mix of the instruments. Since the bass was forward in the sub-mix, since I needed to bring up the levels of the guitars (mid range and upper frequencies) I duplicated the two main instrumental tracks as to ‘blend in’ (make louder) such instruments. Simply put, I rolled out the bass (pulled down all frequencies from around 250 cycles down to zero) and blended in with the original two tracks when mixing.

The strings were recorded and bounced as with other songs recorded on the 8-track format.

The vocals get loud as the song grows — I would not typically let that happen but in this case, that was the concept — simply a bunch of small mid range frequency instrument information and the way to grow the mix was to bump up the vocals.

The vocals were recorded too bright (as usual for the era). As much as I tried to back off the pain, there is still occasionally some of the dreaded 2.5 kHz frequency range.

No matter and as always, Tata sings great!!! As with most of this stuff on the CD, we recorded in just one or two passes leading to the typical little pitch problems and some slight phrasing matching problems within the lead vocal double and harmony parts. In any case, no matter as her vocals are always outstanding!

Stevie Wonder once heard Tata sing in the halls of Motown recording studios (LA). Stevie said, "You sing like me."

Artist(s) that recorded the song

None

    18. IF THERE'S A WAY - instrumental track (3:04)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Guitars, and Synths: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Jeff Porcaro
  • Bass: Dave McDaniel
  • Arranged by: Jay Graydon
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon
This is just the track with no vocal. Even though my playing is very loose, Jeff Porcaro played his ass off as usual. A very exciting performance by Jeff so I thought it would be nice to hear the nuances without the vocal overriding the track.

Yea, all the same details as noted in the vocal version.

    19. WHAT GOOD IS LOVE - instrumental track (3:22)
  • Songwriter: Jay Graydon, Harry Garfield
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), COOP Music (ASCAP)
  • Guitars: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Willy Ornelas
  • Bass: (Most likely David Hungate)
  • Fender Rhodes: Greg Mathieson
  • Produced and arranged by Jay Graydon
Good instrumental performances all around so I thought it would be nice to include a non-vocal version.

Yea, all the same details as noted in the vocal version.

    20. IT'S RIGHT TO BE IN LOVE (3:21)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Bill Champlin
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Music Sales (ASCAP)
  • Vocals: Bill Champlin
  • Fender Rhodes Piano: Greg Mathieson
  • Guitars and Synths: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Mike Baird
  • Bass: Mike Porcaro
  • Arranged by: Jay Graydon
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon
Recording Studio(s)

My home studio of the era.

Recording console (mixer) Recorder, and Tape Format

The mixer was most likely the Quantum. The original recording format was 2” tape recorded on a 16 -track 3M 56 recorder.

Details and Memories

When starting to work on the mix I discovered that Bill Champlin had surely sang all day before singing the vocals on this song as his voice was giving out in the "Out Choruses." Bill’s voice was shot for the night. I kept in some of the stuff until he was totally vocally trashed. The Background vocals then take over.

So important to note that Bill always works his ass off no matter what! If his voice were giving out, he would figure out ways to work around the vocal cord stress. This song was vocally demanding in the many "out" choruses. Since his voice was trashed, it was time to stop recording as further "passes" would have been fruitless causing Bill physical damage to his vocal cords.

Yea, these songs were just intended as demos I and got what I got (very happily) since the singers and musicians played on the stuff between gigs. In a way, this is incredible as noting performances for fun with no pressure of the "for hire" gig! Note I did the same for others playing on demos for friends.

I would have faded the song slightly earlier but Mike Baird plays a great inventive drum fill I really wanted to be heard. This is the fill in the middle of the fade. Yea, he also plays many cool fills throughout the song!

When listening to the guitar solo in the track, there is no doubt I followed Greg Mathieson’s Fender Rhodes piano part (top note) for the first half of the first three phrases. At that point in the song, things get crowded so hard to hear the Rhodes part at that point.

There are some distortion problems on the Fender Rhodes in the "out choruses". Setting up quickly for a demo with little time allowed as to pay attention to recording levels — the first take may be solid and if a little distortion, that is the way it goes. The bottom line here is the distortion is hard to detect as the song is crowed with a wall of sound at the point (not a bad thing as major impact is happening).

A very strange sonic problem with the two-synth string tracks after the first listening. After discovery, it was obvious the original parts were bounced to one track that was then re-recorded to another track through a harmonizer. That track has horrible audio artifacts. I passed on using the track and did a fake stereo split with the strings using a short delay line.

Once again, I did not own great microphones at that point in time. The recorded vocal sonics were terrible on this song — boxy (thick like mud in the 500-cycle range) and sometimes loaded with 2 kHz (yea, the painful upper mid-range/low treble frequency. Two frequency areas that have the ‘guts’ of the sound. Taking away in either frequency area "smalls up the sound". Automated EQ rides as usual taking many hours.

Such is the way it went with the mic I used BUT the good news is with PRO TOOLS, finally, the recordings can be made to sound presentable. I should have started with Bill sings his ass off as usual so the sonics are not that big of a deal.

Artist(s) that recorded the song

None.

**********
FOR THE JAPANESE VERSION:

A slight change in the tracks order plus a bonus track, as follows...

    20. IT'S RIGHT TO BE IN LOVE - instrumental track (3:21)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Bill Champlin
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Music Sales (ASCAP)
  • Fender Rhodes Piano: Greg Mathieson
  • Guitars and Synths: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Mike Baird
  • Bass: Mike Porcaro
  • Arranged by: Jay Graydon
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon

    21. IT'S RIGHT TO BE IN LOVE (3:21)
  • Songwriters: Jay Graydon, Bill Champlin
  • Publishers: Garden Rake Music (ASCAP), Music Sales (ASCAP)
  • Vocals: Bill Champlin
  • Fender Rhodes Piano: Greg Mathieson
  • Guitars and Synths: Jay Graydon
  • Drums: Mike Baird
  • Bass: Mike Porcaro
  • Arranged by: Jay Graydon
  • Produced by: Jay Graydon

Label: King Records, Japan
Catalog Number: KICP_1176
Release date: August 23, 2006


**********


Very Special Thanks:

To my brother Gary: you are the best brother anyone can have on so many levels!!! I love you Bro.

To Ian Eales: it is rare in life to have a friend that is a close as a blood brother. I truly love you like a brother.

I have two adopted sisters and love them and their families.

1. My extended family is the Olofsson’s. Sis (Kerstin), I thank you so much for your continued support and the major work performed daily as to deal with the web site and so many business issues!!! Lage, I thank you for the continued support and the layout as to compute the math files for STR. Stefan and Peppe, you guys will surely be successful in the music business!!! Your work on the BEBOP CD transcriptions was exceptional!!!

2. My other extended family is the Lara’s, Catalina, I thank you for nearly 20 years of running my household!!! Yea, you are a sister as well!!! I also thank Jose, Scott, and Kelly for being such good beings with a heart of gold!!!

Female companions over the years (using sir last names of the era in which we were together) that were/are very supportive of my work:
  • Jan Adams
  • Bobette Graydon
  • Valerie Hoebel
  • Melinda Rue
  • Denise Marie Luko - (internationally published fine art photographer/photo journalist, who took the photo of Jay, which we used on the cover artwork. - Webmaster's remark)
Most gracious ladies, I thank you for your continued support as well as putting up with my quirks. I love you all.

To Toshi Nakada: You hold more knowledge regarding pop recordings that anyone on the planet!!! Be proud my friend!!! I appreciate your constant support and thank you for playing the near completed master for the Japanese record companies as to get a deal! You are a true friend!!!

Techs: Over the years, I have had the pleasure to know the following people. Great friends and incredible technicians! I will list in order of when they performed work at Garden Rake.
  • Paul Grupp (tech for the first Garden Rake Studios around 1972).
  • Phil Mendolsen (the tech for the second Garden Rake studio)
  • Gary Starr (not a tech for my studio but designed the rooms for the third Garden Rake studio in 1980).
  • Ian Eales (the tech and 2nd engineer for the third Garden Rake Studio)
  • Greg Loskorn (the tech and 2nd engineer for the third Garden Rake Studio after Ian).
  • Ian Eales (Ian returns in 1994 after the California earthquake as to redesign the studio electronically as well as doing some tech work).
  • Scott Holderman (an occasional tech specializing in analog recorders).
  • Dave Clark (Outstanding Neve tech always chasing down the most bizarre problems).
  • Ian Eales (After the Neve people met Ian when installing the Garden Rake NEVE V2, they were so impressed, Ian ended up designing NEVE consoles for a while! Ian is always there when needed on so many levels).
Yea, Ian was mentioned three times as he always came back when needed! Garden Rake is as much Ian’s room as mine!

When learning Pro Tools, the following people were major in helping my learning process. I thank you guys so much as to get me into the learning curve details!
  • Tim Hosman
  • Steve Sykes
  • Jon Connolly
Thanks also to Vox amplifiers.

Musicians and Vocalists

Clearly some of the best musicians and singers ever as well as great friends!!! Thanks so much for the creativity!!!

    Keyboards:
  • David Foster
  • Greg Mathieson
    Drums:
  • Jeff Porcaro
  • Willy Ornelas
  • Mike Baird
  • Ralph Humphrey
    Bass:
  • Dave McDaniel
  • David Hungate
  • Mike Porcaro
  • (Most likely David Shields)
    Vocalists:
  • Bill Champlin
  • Ed Whiting
  • Marc Jordan
  • Tata Vega
  • Lisa DalBello
  • Nettie Gloud
  • Carmen Twillie

Songwriters: Man, such great creative work from such talented people as well as great friends!!!
  • David Foster
  • Harry Garfield
  • Bill Champlin
  • Marc Jordan
  • B J Cook Foster

Before I close, I must note David Foster is clearly a genius!!! His involvement on the co-written songs, his outstanding arrangements, his incredible musical ideas, his production ideas, all lead to melodic ear candy as delicious as it gets!!!

I had fun revisiting the never released recordings of around thirty years ago (until it turned into major work ) and I hope you enjoy the musical journey into the past. Note that the past becomes the present if never before hearing the recording.


All written material, all images and photos in all sections of this website copyright © Jay Graydon/KEO 1996 - 2015. All rights reserved. Comments, suggestions, appreciation, corrections... whatever... talk to us.

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